Our sense of belonging is deepened when we really know and love a place.

 

I'm Australian. I love the deserts, the beaches, the rolling hills, the ancient feel and the winding rivers. My favourite places of all are the sand dunes. When i sit in sand dunes for a while, everything seems to settle into a place where it feels just right. I think this is because they make sense to me, the way they seem to be a solid thing but are actually more like a wave in time, a collection of countless fragments held together by mutual consort, by the way the wind has moved them and the ground has held them in place.

 

The Henty Dunes in western Tasmania. Where i grew up, on the fringes of Port Adelaide, the dunes were not much more than large ripples of sand at the edge of the beach. These ones are gigantic. I like 'em all.

The Henty Dunes in western Tasmania. Where i grew up, on the fringes of Port Adelaide, the dunes were not much more than large ripples of sand at the edge of the beach. These ones are gigantic. I like 'em all.

 

Now i'm lucky enough to live on the south coast of New South Wales. This is Yuin country, firstly, and we'll be introduced to some traditional culture owners as we go. But for now, it is a place where i can get to know myself as a member of an ecological community anew. Where i swim i know there are sharks; the skies are filled with birds; in the ground are many snakes and spiders; and the land is dotted with farms, many based on sound principles of sustainable agriculture. I've hiked up Gulaga, the sacred mountain, with senior Yuin elder Uncle Max Harrison, dines on prawns and fish drawn directly from the sea and inland lakes, filmed new sections of the City Living, Nature Calling ecomythic doco series, and kayaked to my heart's content on the Tomaga River, which runs directly past my front yard. This is a place i am proud to call home, even when i miss my friends and family back in Melbourne.